Domains with Hyphens, a Bad Idea

domains with hyphens

Domains with Hyphens are a bad idea.  I would avoid them at all costs honestly.

I can understand the inclination of wanting to register or buy a hyphenated domain name though.  Most of the time the exact match domain (EMD) or partial match domain (PMD) with the keywords you are looking to rank for is not available.  You've seen other people use domains with a hyphen before and rank well or even in the first spot in Google.

If I am advising a client or company about a domain name I do not recommend buying or registering any domains with hyphens.  A hyphen in a domain name or even several hyphens makes the domain hard to remember and hard to spell or type.  You might remember my article “7 Slick Tips for Choosing a Good Domain Name.”  You will see I discuss the fact that a domain should be easily heard on the radio and you should be able to write it down without trouble.  This is what's known as the “radio test.”  A hyphen ruins the train of thought and flow of spelling it's not likely people will remember a domain with a hyphen when typing words or letters into a browser.

To be honest I am actually a domain name hyphen expert.  Why is this?  Well you might see that this website is my name, Adam Yamada, but my full name is “Adam Yamada-Hanff.”  I have a hyphenated last name and you'd be pretty surprised the amount of people I come into contact with that do not know what a hyphen is.

There have been many times when I am spelling out my full name over the phone and the person is confused because they are not sure what hyphen is.  (Even if they don't want to admit it.) Even if I am filling out a form or working with someone in an office directly they can still be confused.  This usually means I have to explain, “You know it's a dash.” or something like that or even fill out the form for them, doing their job.  It's been quite frustrating over the years and makes you realize how many dull people there are in the world.

Imagine spending all that time explaining your business web address to client or customer?  It's annoying for both sides and I know from a lot experience dealing with a hyphenated last name.  Domains with hyphens are something you should try to avoid if you can.  I'd recommend registering or buying an. ORG domain over a hyphenated .COM domain actually.

Honestly people should know what a hyphen is!  Why they don't I am not really sure if that is a sign of basic English skills going out the window or something else.

Have any thoughts about a hyphenated domain names?  Have you ever registered or bought domain names with hyphens?   If you have used domains with hyphens did it hurt your business and make it hard for people to remember how to find you?  Let's hear stories and experience below.

Schema Markup removes Google Authorship in SERPS

Recently I've been playing around with adding Schema Markup to enhance certain posts on this blog.  Something I've just noticed and found out is that Schema Markup removes Google Authorship in Google's Search Engine Result Pages (SERPs).

In this picture you can see a NameCheap Review I posted awhile ago if you do a search for “NameCheap Review” in Google's SERPS.  I wanted to see if implementing Schema markup would improve my Search Engine Optimization (SEO) rankings and give me higher Click-Through-Rates (CTR) to my sites.

schema markup removes google authorship

Indeed the Schema markup I put on the page was being picked up and read by Google but it was no longer showing my Google Authorship picture profile next to the post.  This means Google is cherry picking what Rich Snippet markup they feel is most relevant to show in a search query.  This kind of makes sense but I thought Google wanted to show as much Rich Snippets to a user before they click on a website.  They don't want to show the Schema markup (star ratings) along with the Google Authorship picture?

The fact that Schema Markup removes Google Authorship in the SERPs is just plain annoying and stupid in my opinion.  They make a big friggin deal about implementing Schema but for reviews if it is going to override your Google+ picture, why would put Schema data in a review post?

Since I hadn't ever seen anyone else use Schema data and Google Authorship in the Google's SERPS when doing searches before I guess I shouldn't be surprised it didn't work.  The thing is if it is the choice between Schema markup in a review and having Google display my Google+ Authorship profile, you'd go with the picture everytime.  It creates more trust and I almost guarantee it will give you better CTRs to your websites.

Here is a post in Google's SERPS about Google celebrating 10 Years of Google Adsense.  You can see my Google Authorship markup .

google adsense 10 years

If Google wants to improve search quality and help people find “High quality content” (still trying to figure what the fuck that means  to Google!) they should allow show both Schema data and Google Authorship in review posts.  I am tired of finding this shit out the hard way!

Let's hear from readers of my blog since I know I have some from my analytics.  Since Schema Markup removes Google Authorship would this encourage or discourage you from using it in posts on your blog and sites?  Does Google make you angry sometimes since they are not always clear about these things?

UPDATE: Some people have asked me how to fix Schema data and markup from showing up in Google SERPS for you websites content and posts.  It's simple, just remove all the Schema markup on pages and posts you don't want it showing up on in SERPs.  It might take Google a few days to over a week to update and show your Google+ authorship picture.

I removed Schema markup from this websites as it doesn't make sense to have it here.  If this was a review or ratings site it probably would be a good idea to have Schema data implemented on pages.

Free Keyword Rank Checker (Google Webmaster Tools)

Did you know that Google Webmaster Tools provides a Free Keyword Rank Checker? Most people don't and here is how to access the data if you are not familiar.  I am assuming you already have Google Analytics installed on your website along with Google Webmaster Tools.  If not, you will not be able to view this keyword ranking data.

  1. Log into Google Webmaster Tools
  2. On the left click “Search Traffic”
  3. Under “Search Traffic” in the dropdown menu then click “Search Queries”
  4. Scroll down and you will see Impressions, Clicks, CTR (Click Through Rate), and Average position.

The important metric you want to think about are your CTRs and your Average position.  CTR means the amount of people clicking through to your website compared to how many times someone has seen it come up in a Google SERPS (search engine ranking pages).  Impressions means how many times your articles and posts get viewed in the Google's SERPS.  (It doesn't track other search engines, not that you should really care though.)

free keyword rank checker What's great about this data is that it is obviously very useful but it is also free.  The reason I am mentioning the SEO (search engine optimization) keyword tracking in Google Webmaster Tools is that a lot of people are spending $30 bucks a month or more on sites and software that do this.  If you are an SEO firm or company that is handling a lots of client's websites then it is definitely useful, but pricey.  Tracking keywords in the SERPS (search engine results page) is how these companies make money, so it only makes sense to want to track client's sites carefully.

Using an external keyword rank checker and tracking tool in my opinion is not necessary for smaller sites and bloggers in my opinion. The reality is if you are not ranking for certain terms, you can work on it, but it will be hard to go up against people with better SEO knowledge and experience.

For most using the free rank checker data within Google Webmaster Tools is going to work just fine for tracking keywords.  If you agree, disagree, or want to recommend a SEO rank checker that you use please let me know.

6 Questions to Ask a Search Engine Optimizer BEFORE your Hire Them

Hiring a Search Engine Optimizer is no easy task.  For one thing there are a lot of people out there that claim they know how to do Search Engine Optimization (SEO) and build quality links, when in fact they don't.  Also there are Search Engine Optimizers that will give a great price that undercuts what everyone else told you.  However, what they don't tell you is they will use all BlackHat (meaning Google doesn't like it) link building techniques to rank your site.  You could very well rank for 1st for some keywords for a couple days or weeks, but most likely your site might get deindexed from Google or face penalties.  You could still be listed in other search engines… but who really cares about those?

search engine optimizerAs someone who's seen and heard of waaay to many people getting ripped off by SEO scammers out there, here are 6 Questions to Ask a Search Engine Optimizer BEFORE you make the decision to hire them.

1. What SEO Software and Tools Do you Use?

Search Engine Optimizers need quite a few SEO tools and software to pull data about competitors websites and to try to figure out how to rank your site for certain keywords and terms.  Typically they will have a subscription to some sort of rank tracking software or monitoring service, link analysis software, and have one or several VPS (Virtual Private Servers) for running some of these programs.  In addition they might have to hire workers via oDesk or another freelancing service for doing small tasks and jobs they don't want to do.  This could be writing articles, contacting blogs or websites where they might be able to post an article with your URL above the fold (this means not as a comment or forum signature link), link analysis, filling out forms, etc.

Any legit Search Engine Optimizer should be honest with you about what SEO tools, software, and subscriptions they are paying for and what tasks they sub-contract other people to do.  Many feel sharing with clients is giving away trade secrets, but that just isn't true.  If you bought SEO tools, guess what, other people bought use those SEO tools too.

Even though I would let clients of mine know what SEO software I use, they obviously don't have the expertise or knowledge to use the effectively.  Of course if later they want to learn, that's fine with me.  The client is paying me for my knowledge and there is always plenty of SEO business out there. 🙂

2. What link building Techniques & Strategies Do you Use? Blackhat or Grayhat?

This is an important question you really need to be on your toes about.  If it's clear they completely use BlackHat techniques, then run away very fast!  (This is hard to know if you don't have any idea about search engine optimization.)

I assume most people that read my website are looking for long term benefits from SEO.  You need someone who understands that and isn't going to give you a bunch of crappy low quality links, even if they drive traffic.

Consider how your potential search optimizer answers question 1# and what tools they told you they use.  Guess what, you should Google it.  Is it SEO software that is mainly used for BlackHat link building?  Then ask how they use the tools and what strategies they use to build links?

To be fair and honest and what you do need to keep in mind… no Search Engine Optimizer, and I mean NOBODY, completely does whitehat SEO.  Everyone works in “Grayhat SEO” when it comes to link building.

Larger sites and companies will buy links, which is technically against Google's guidelines, for certain keywords they want to rank for.  Smaller sites and blogs don't care since they need the money.  (I know since I've been there.)  It's not like Google isn't aware of it but I've never seen Google do much about it since a lot of these companies have large advertising deals with Google.  Also there is no way the bots are smart enough to figure this out on ever single website out there.

A lot of SEO software is not necessarily considered “whitehat” by Google.  For instance I use a program called ScrapeBox, which everyone uses.  You can't use ScrapeBox with one IP address or Google would ban it.  ScrapeBox sends to many automated queries at one time, so if you are going to use it you need to buy proxies.  ScrapeBox is not a bad tool in my opinion, but Google doesn't like how it pulls data.

Bottom line, a Search Engine Optimizers should be honest about SEO strategies and link building tactics they will use for your website before you give them any money.  Like I said I'd keep in mind Google expects everyone to play fair, but nobody does.

3. What Keywords can you Rank me for within my Budget?

Before you talk with a Search Engine Optimizer you should figure out how much you can spend monthly or for a one-time upfront cost.  You need to understand that harder the keywords you want to rank for, the more time and therefore money it will require.

If you are told by a company they can rank you for some crazy competitive keywords such as “make money online” they might be able to… but it will cost you a lot of money.  That's why nobody posts pricing on directly on their websites.  It doesn't make sense since they are billions of searches for different categories and regions.  Cost and difficulty range with regards to what keywords and terms you want to rank in Google for.

There should be a discussion of what is doable within your SEO budget.  I'm not saying you should not expect something for your money, but understand some companies spend $500-$2,000 a month with SEO firms while other are spending upwards of $10,000+ for a whole range of SEO, social media, and website development services.

4. Can you Guarantee 1# Ranking?

This a bit of a trick question since the answer, should be “No!”  If you work with a huge SEO company that's been in the game for awhile and you are paying them tons of money each month, then it might be possible if they have the staff and resources.  Still there is no way any Search Engine Optimizers or company can “100% Guarantee” #1 sport ranking in Google for extraordinarily competitive keywords.

Even these large SEO companies can't always figure out how to get a 1# SERP (search engine results pages) ranking.  People who claim otherwise are blowing smoke.

Google rankings are NOT determined by the search optimizers you hire.  They are determined by Google and their massive computing power and stupid algorithms which sometimes nobody can figure out.  There are over 200 different ranking factors Google uses and they don't tell the public what all of these are.

5. Do you hate Matt Cutts?

The answer to this question, should be “Yes!”  (In case you don't know who Matt Cutts heads the Webspam team at Google and works on Google's search algorithm.  He wrote the family filter engine for Google as well.)

I personally don't trust a lot of things Matt Cutts tells people in the Google Webmaster Help videos on Youtube.  He tells you what Google doesn't like, not what doesn't work.  These are 2 very different things and SEO pros know the difference and will exploit them.

Watching the Google Webmaster Help videos is good for many reasons though.  For instance I wouldn't have been aware Google changed their stance on .IO domains for global use.  Also he gives straight-up advice like Don't Buy a Spam Domain and that you should always Link to Your Sources.

Often times it is quite difficult to figure out what he means in these Youtube videos though.  The issue is he is trying to appeal to beginners watching these videos that don't know much about SEO and people in the SEO industry, which doesn't work.  This was clear when Penguin 2.0 hit and his answers about regarding “Does site downtime hurt Search Engine rankings?” should have been more clearcut.  (That's why there was a website created call The Short Cutts.)  Additionally Matt Cutts SEO talk at WordCamp 2009 doesn't tell the whole story about Google and SEO.  There are a lot more factors that go into ranking than diverse keywords in articles.

6. Do you hate Google?

The answer should always be “Yes!”  🙂

Other Questions to Ask a Search Engine Optimizer

Obviously I can't account for what your specific situation or website needs are.  There are too many factors or specialty areas.  So you need to feel out how the SEO company or Search Engine Optimizer you are going to hire seems.  Do they seem like an “SEO Diva?” or are they pretty chill.  Try to think of other questions and definitely get on Skype or Google+ to talk with them “face to face” if you can.  If they don't want to take a little time to answer your questions I'd find someone else.

Personally if I get hired by a small business to do SEO work I am always open about what I am doing and I keep them updated.  They are paying me to do work for them and it's my job to make it clear what I am doing and how I am doing it, so they feel they are getting value for their money.  I even try to provide clients with tools and resources other people wouldn't.  Transparency is not something you find often in the SEO world, but you should expect it from whoever you hire in my opinion.  (If you want to Hire Me, I'd be happy to talk with you by the way.)

Ranking in search engines is something you should want to do in the long term, not short term.  Be careful who you hire and just make sure you feel comfortable working with them and what they are going to do with your website.

Think I missed something?  Have anything to add regarding SEO or search optimizers?  Let me know below!

Catch me on Twitter @AdamYamada … if you can!

Google Keyword Tool now the Google Keyword Planner

google keyword tool

If you like to use Google's well known Google Keyword Tool, then it is probably no surprise  to you that Google has planned to shutdown the Google Adword Keyword Tool and Traffic Estimator for awhile now to replace it with the new Google Keyword Planner.  I noticed that just in the last week the Keyword Tool URL now redirects to the new and, what Google claims, improved Google Keyword Planner.

In a post on Inside Adwords, the official Google Adwords blog, on May 20th 2013 this is why Google says it has switched from the Google Keyword Tool to the Google Keyword Planner.

We’re constantly working to simplify the process of building campaigns, and today we’re happy to announce the launch of a new tool, Keyword Planner, which combines the functionality of the Keyword Tool and Traffic Estimator into a smooth, integrated workflow. You can use Keyword Planner to find new keyword and ad group ideasget performance estimates for them to find the bid and budget that are right for you, and then add them to your campaigns. You’ll also see some new features in the tool – some of which we’ll highlight below.

To put this into terms people can understand this basically means Google built the Keyword Planner to try to make it easier and simpler for advertisers to figure out which search phrases they want to bid on.  Google obviously wants to give as much data and tools as possible since the more advertising on Google Adwords, the more money they will make.  The Keyword Planner includes several new features compared to the Google Keyword Tool.  This includes;

  • Multiply keywords in 2 different lists to generate new keywords you mightnot have thought of.
  • You can geotarget not juts countries, but specific cities and regions.
  • A graph showing the search volumes for selected keywords or phrases by month by month.  This allows you to see when certain terms have a higher volume of searches.

The Google Keyword Tool and Google Traffic Estimator are not exactly retired as they were merged into the Google Keyword Planner.  You can do everything you used to do but supposedly even better with the Keyword Planner.

Since I try to make the most of my articles (of course you can't always do that) SEO friendly and keyword optimized I used to use the Google Keyword Tool all the time.  Even external SEO programs, like Long Tail Pro, pulled most of their data from the Google Keyword Tool too. While I appreciate it when companies update their tools and services when they are free, I am having a bit of trouble getting used to the Keyword Planner.  Since the Keyword Tool has been around for so long I know my way around it easily.  The Google Keyword Planner is taking some getting used too.  I like  the new features but find some of the new layout and tools confusing.

If you are a SEO (search engine optimizer), SEM (search engine marketer), advertiser, or do a lot of keyword research what do you think of Google changing over from the Keyword Tool to the Keyword Planner?  Do you like the new tool or wish Google kept the Keyword Tool and just added the new features?

Affiliate Summit Review – Total Waste of Time and Money

I just spent the past couple of days attending Affiliate Summit.  This was the first time I attended an Affiliate Summit and it was an interesting experience with it's ups and downs to say the least.  So I thought I'd write an Affiliate Summit Review letting people know what I thought of the event.

The conference has been quite a lot to absorb the past few days and I learned a lot. Mainly that people that particpate in affiliate marketing and go to affiliate marketing conferences, you know affiliate marketers, are unhelpful, selfish, annoying, and really kind of difficult to deal w.

To make understanding what Affiliate Summit is about and what you get when you go , I've broken it down into easy to understand sections.  This will also help better share my review, recap, and thoughts about attending Affiliate Summit in this Affiliate Summit Review. (In case you were wondering this is not a positive review.)

affiliate summit

Why attend Affiliate Summit?

The main benefit of attending Affiliate Summit, like most conferences, is networking and meeting new people and companies that can hopefully grow your online business and ventures and take them to the next level.

This is the main reason I spent my money to go Affiliate Summit.  I wanted to connect with companies and people that could help me figure out different revenue streams besides what I've used before.   The nice thing about Affialte Summit is that this is everyone else goal too, to make more money.

Affiliate Summit has a Meet Market to help facilitate this during the conference.  This is where companies setup booths and hawk their programs to potential clients and affiliates.  Think of it like “speed dating” but for making business contacts.  While the Meet Market was a bit chaotic and I spent many hours talking with different people and companies before I found the right matches.

What is confusing about the Meet Market is that not all the companies that they list in the directory setup and display on the same day.  This isn't clear and I was a bit annoyed when I realized this was the case.   A few companies I wanted to go talk with on Sunday, when Affiliate Summit East started, were not there so I had to wait until Monday.

There are also talks and sessions during the day you can attend but you must have a VIP or All Access past to go all of them.  If you have a Networking Plus Pass, like I did, technically you are only allowed to go to one a day.  In addition if you are new to Affiliate Summit there is a Newbie Affiliate Marketing Lab (of course I didn't find that all that useful) and a “Meet the Experts” session which was good.

What Type of People attend Affiliate Summit?

A wide range of people show up, this includes;

  • Companies looking to get into affiliate marketing and attract affiliates into their programs.
  • People or companies looking to buy web traffic.
  • People or companies looking to sell traffic.
  • Online publishers and bloggers searching for partnerships.
  • Affiliate marketing program managers trying to attract new affiliates.
  • SEO (search engine optimization) specialists and SEM (search engine marketers).
  • Media agencies that handle social media.
  • and even more.

This year they were 4,500+ attendees at Affiliate Summit East 2013, so you can imagine a lot of different people went.  I heard many people speaking foreign languages at Affiliate Summit.  I met people from Israel, China, Canada, Spain, and Germany.  So people come from all over the country and world to attend.

The majority of the age group that goes, from what I can tell, are in the 21-30 year old crowd.  There are older people and executives that attend but the organizers seem to want to cater to a young and hip crowd.   This was clear by some of the attractive girls working the front new attendee registration desk.

I met some interesting and helpful people at Affiliate Summit, but FYI there were few and far between.  Do you have a bad opinion about affiliate and internet marketers? If you think attending Affiliate Summit will change your mind about them, it won't.  It will only make you more jaded.

One guy that came up to me was trying to sell me on his payday loan affiliate network.  Eck!  Not only was I definitely not interested but I didn't even bother to use the energy to say I wasn't interested.  I just walked away and didn't say anything.  While this might be rude I don't want to associate myself with anything to do with payday loans.

There were several other companies there that work in that space too.  Additionally a lot of the affiliate programs there were for other shady shit.  For instance browser spyware downloads but… hey you earn $1.50 a download.

I personally don't' want to be involved with these companies.  Clearly a lot of people at Affiliate Summit have absolutely no problem with it. And internet and affiliate marketers wonder why they have a bad reputation?  Stop bitching!  You let these assfucks into your affiliate marketing conference.

FYI I wasn't the only person there who thought this.  Talking with a lot of other attendees they shared my views (and more importantly morals).  Even other ad networks I had meetings with seem to be aware of the spammers, scammers, and trolls making the rounds at Affiliate Summit.  They made it clear they have legitimate products and want to branch-out to more bloggers and online publishers.

It takes a lifetime to build a reputation and 5 minutes to ruin it.  Affiliate Marketers reputation for me was ruined in less than 30 seconds while talking with some of these companies and people.

What will I learn at Affiliate Summit?

This really depends on you as a person and what you came to Affiliate Summit for.  I wanted to learn about lead generation companies and how I could work with them.  In addition I wanted to get a lot of advice about improving web traffic and SEO (search engine optimization).

The talks might fill some of your learning and education needs but some of them probably won't.  I am pretty good at picking good talks to attend and luckily the 2 our of the 3 sessions I want to I felt were worth my time.  Talking with some other attendees a lot of people said that wasn't the case, since they were more interested in detailed info which the presenter did not provide.

Really the learning comes back to networking.  I learned more from having casual conversations with people.  I meet a guy from the England who knows a lot about email list building and making money from these huge email lists.  He has over 90,000+ subscribers and makes a full-time living doing it.  He was telling me a lot about what he does with his list which was waaay more valuable than anything I heard heard at previous talks on email marketing.

His email lists are so profitable he bought a Cessna.  In addition he bought and built a kit plane which he flew 15,000 hours around Europe.  All working from home.  How freakin awesome is that?

Also I hungout with a local SEO expert who used to work with SEER Interactive in Philadelphia.  (He was moving back to Salt Lake City.)  He taught me a couple things about local SEO that I did not know and we had some nice conversations about our web projects we want to launch, domain names, and topics related to the internet and web marketing.

There was still a lot I thought I would learn at Affiliate Summit though which I didn't get though.  Hopefully they will work on improving that.

How is the Venue and Location?

What made the experience even less fun for me was I really don't like Philadelphia.  Walking around I don't find it a particularly attractive city.  It feels like the city planners forgot to consider whether certain buildings would mesh sitting next to each other.  Also a good majority of the streets really smell which is big negative for me.  On top of that the only friendly people from Philly I talked with was Ben, from SEER Interactive, and the workers at the hotel.  Ben wasn't a native to Philly and of course the hotel staff will be nice, so that doesn't count.  Also I hate the Eagles.  (Ravens are the only birds I root for. )

Considering how much money they charge and how long the organizers have been doing Affiliate Summits I assumed they would have a lot more things nailed down.  They did move Affiliate Summit East from New York City to Philadelphia this year.  It seemed like they were not quite aware of how best to setup in the Philadelphia Convention Center most of the signs were not clear.  The nice thing was there was a lot of open space for tables which facilitated networking and talking.

I think for next year it would be nice if they moved it out of Philadelphia.  I noticed that Baltimore was a possibility and Charlotte were options.  I think either city would be much more ideal as I prefer smaller cities but not Philly.

How are the Affiliate Summit Parites?

The parties are well planned, executed, and organized.  Since the Affiliate Summit Parties seem to get pretty wild it seems that is why a lot of people attend.  They have open bars which are taken advantage of readily.  In addition Busta Rhymes and Evander Holyfield were at the party on Monday night.  I guess this is important if you want to go to parties with celebrities.

When I was sitting down talking with an ad network that specializes in content locking the company rep told me, “Yeah I've never seen people get so wasted.”  He mentioned that he went to the parties but had a lot of meetings, which were later cancelled due to people being hungover.

The thing is partying was not really my concern and why I showed up to Affiliate Summit East 2013.  Sure, I had a few beers and fun but I wasn't going to get wasted.  My main goal was learning and networking as much as possible.  I'll have plenty of opportunities to get drunk if I want to in the future.

Would you Return to Affiliate Summit?

I talked with a lot of people, that I didn't want to, and overall it was NOT a positivie experience for me. What I wanted to get out of Affiliate Summit I didn't and I wouldn't see a reason to go back again unless I was invited to be a speaker.  I doubt that will happen because of this honest Affiliate Summit review and recap.  I believe too many people are hungover to actually realize it is not a a good conference.

They do charge a pretty good amount for these tickets and a lot of the people that bought VIP and All Access passes felt it was worth it.

Final Thoughts about Affiliate Summit

Bottom line for me is I thought Affiliate Summit was a huge waste of my time and money.  I wouldn't use my resources on a Networking Plus Pass, airfare, hotels, and other expenses to attend again.

While you might read a lot of positive opinions about Affiliate Summit, keep in most of those people probably came to go to the parties.  So of course they are going to write positive things about it… they were drunk.

When I spend my time and money to attend a conference I expect to learn A LOT I don't already know.  From what I can tell a lot of people are regurgitating the same BS info which I don't need to hear.  I need to hear the tricks they know, but probably don't want to share, to really take myself to the next level.

If you attended Affiliate Summit East, or another Affiliate Summit before, what do you think about it?  Did you enjoy it or dislike it?  Would you go again in the future or was once enough?  Did you learn anything or find that you were teaching other people?